The ALS Challenge

If you haven’t seen somebody do the ALS ice-bucket challenge you have probably been living under a rock.  If you have an active Facebook page like me then you more than likely see 5 -10 a day.  This past week not only did I see videos but I witnessed one in person and my son participated in one. I don’t remember any kind of charity event that has really taken off like this one has.  But what has prompted me to write about it is the folks that have been criticizing the challenge.   Of course everyone is entitled to their opinion and I have no problem with someone who genuinely does not want to participate or cannot donate.  As far as I’m concerned that is their business and their choice.  What I do have a problem with is those that feel the need to criticize anyone and everyone who has chosen to participate.  The reasons they give range from wasting water to people being uninformed and simply doing it for attention.  I find the last one a little hypocritical since most of the most of those speaking out against the practice also posted a video.  If I was challenged I’m not sure I would do it or donate but I certainly have no problem with anyone that does.  I see no problem with bringing awareness to a good cause and I think it is awesome that people are trying to have a little fun while doing something good.  It has helped to raise more money than they have ever done for ALS research.  But the main reason that I think it is a good thing is I have talked to one friend that has had a relative suffer from ALS and I have seen three videos created by ALS patients.  Everyone of the ALS patients has said that each time they see an ALS challenge it gives them hope.  Each time they see a challenge awareness is raised and hope is given.  Each time they see one they have hope that someone is no more sympathetic and can relate a little more. I can only imagine what it would be like to have an incurable disease.  If something as simple as pouring a bucket of ice water on someone’s head gives another person hope then that is a small price to pay.  Inspirational author Orison Swett Marden said, “There is no medicine like hope, no incentive so great, and no tonic so powerful as expectation of something tomorrow.”  Sometimes we can’t give much but if we give hope we have given enough.

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